Dubbo Photo News & Dubbo Weekender

Now, hear this!

Dubbo North Public relieving principal Rebecca Letfellah presents the older model ‘Front Row To Go’ sound systems to Dubbo Deaf Club secretary Vicki Mortimer and Dubbo Deaf Club and Hear Our Heart treasurer Ian Redenbach. PHOTO: DUBBO PHOTO NEWS Dubbo North Public relieving principal Rebecca Letfellah presents the older model ‘Front Row To Go’ sound systems to Dubbo Deaf Club secretary Vicki Mortimer and Dubbo Deaf Club and Hear Our Heart treasurer Ian Redenbach. PHOTO: DUBBO PHOTO NEWS

Not being able to see a white board in the classroom is one thing, but not being able to hear what your teacher says is another, making learning, concentrating, being interested, participating and developing as a student near impossible.

It’s a fact not lost on Dubbo North Public School which long ago installed sound systems in every classroom to help teachers be heard. The benefits to teachers is they don’t need to strain their voices.

“A lot of our students are Aboriginal and they have a higher incidence of otitis media, a middle ear infection which causes mild hearing loss. It makes it very difficult for them to learn,” the school’s relieving principal Rebecca Letfellah told Dubbo Photo News.

During a recent upgrade of their current system they generously donated three of the older generation speaker and microphone units to the Hear Our Heart Ear Bus project.

“We haven’t decided yet what we’ll do with the systems but we’ll identify the best possible place for them,” Dubbo Deaf Club secretary Vicki Mortimer explained.

“They are very expensive and would need a lot of fundraising if we were to raise the money ourselves,” she said. Each system is valued between $1800 and $2000.

That’s money they’re glad not to take away from the Hear Our Heart Bus Project which is looking forward to a major announcement in early April.

“The Hear Our Heart project really gives support not just to the children but to parents too, who when they do learn their child has a problem can turn to our volunteers for help,” said Dubbo Deaf Club and Hear Our Heart treasurer Ian Redenbach.

“It really is about leaving no child behind,” Vicki added.

One in three children over the age of 8 have hearing problems, and more so for the Aboriginal population.