Dubbo Photo News & Dubbo Weekender

Great eco ideas are putting down solid roots

Letrelle Bamblett is just 12, and happy to give up a few Sunday hours when it’s for the community good. Photo: Dubbo Photo News Letrelle Bamblett is just 12, and happy to give up a few Sunday hours when it’s for the community good. Photo: Dubbo Photo News

Last week a group of YMCA kids from the USA helped prepare Troy Junction for a cultural community planting to align with Tree Day and on Sunday more than 85 community members filled those holes with native trees.

Dubbo Macquarie Bushcare organised the weekend event and can’t believe the surge in volunteer response since local environmental groups have begun to coordinate activities.

The day saw a busload from the Clontarf Academy doing its bit for Dubbo and the participants loved it according to operations officer Daniel Bain.

“We’re just down here planting some trees as part of our community work and also to help getting involved with community groups.”

Letrelle Bamblett is just 12, and happy to give up a few Sunday hours when it’s for the community good, and he gets to do the work with his mates.

“I think it’s fun, something to do, good for the environment and good to be down here helping out with my mates, helping the community,” Leterelle said.

David Harris runs the Inland Waterways River Repair Bus and has been working on the site for weeks with his crew.

“Today’s a fantastic day, a cultural and community day down here at Troy Reserve. We’ve got a large group of the community down here and we’d already dug a heap of holes and prepped the area so today is just about the kids coming down and getting some trees in and taking ownership and pride in the area,” David said.

“In years to come this will be a fantastic legacy for these guys, there’ll be birds and insects and all that sort of stuff around these trees that we’re growing. They’re all native trees, they’re all supposed to be here, we’ve got lots of different varieties, wattle trees that’ll have blossoms on them for butterflies and birds.”

He was pleased to connect with traditional owner Coral Peckham, who’s able to educate him in the cultural significance and local history of the area. Aunty Coral had the land’s lore handed down to her through generations of ancestors who lived on this land.

“I’m very proud to be here today involved in this tree plant and to educate the wider community on this area; this is actually my ancestral home,” Aunty Coral said, taking time out to pass on her knowledge to grandson Rush.

“I’ve been telling him stories about the place, his grandmother crossing the river here and we’re planting particular trees that have a cultural meaning. It’s important to pass down that knowledge and only the locals, the traditional people from country, can tell those stories. It’s very important,” she said.

Dubbo Macquarie Bushcare’s Melissa Gray said many hands can make light work, she was pleased to see the huge response meant no individuals were condemned to a day’s hard labour and there was plenty of time to catch up for a yarn at the free barbecue put on by Dubbo Regional Council staff after the planting was finished.